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Corona Virus

As of February 24, 2020, there have been no confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus in Dallas County and the health risk to the general public remains low. DCHHS is working closely with regional partners to prevent the spread of coronavirus to Dallas County, including public health monitoring of travelers screened at international airports, outreach and educational efforts to local hospitals and health care providers, educational institutions, and many other local partners.

DCHHS will continue to provide updates and work with local healthcare providers to monitor this novel coronavirus. Dallas County residents, students, workers, and visitors should continue to engage in their regular activities and practice good personal hygiene as this is the height of flu season across the County.

The following preventive measures should be taken to help reduce the spread of COVID-19:

* Stay home when you are sick.* Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.* Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.* Avoid close contact with people who are sick.* Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.* Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve (not your hands).

Please visit the DCHHS Novel Coronavirus webpage for FAQs and other resources that can be shared with members of the community: https://www.dallascounty.org/departments/dchhs/2019-novel-coronavirus.php (http://www.mmsend52.com/link.cfm?r=rnIiOJ4dtLQcq-R6TMlmeg~~&pe=-qyOkjvhw1RuPfdfwWn1CBaaSFDSkX5z9Dof5FkJTVRuR_CJm_8h7aBL7dxIobSaRUrqRwlUiMX9xxYyhHarLA~~&t=qLGVMC130IqtRAjznXvlwQ~~) .

Of specific note, DCHHS provides this checklist (http://www.mmsend52.com/link.cfm?r=rnIiOJ4dtLQcq-R6TMlmeg~~&pe=G-mXWLWoHcGCvttZc44F9fmsblp9gq7q1-iOkVp0uwHB5ZXZwN_a5P_LhJWpRWjwDTPodRrhkhq3_GHVpYY26g~~&t=qLGVMC130IqtRAjznXvlwQ~~) for physicians in the proper protocol for evaluating patients.

Additionally, clinicians who have questions about examining patients and proper personal protective equipment, please review the CDC PPE guidelines here (http://www.mmsend52.com/link.cfm?r=rnIiOJ4dtLQcq-R6TMlmeg~~&pe=Xm1WVvqtHKoBN0G5A6gXghDi25-RWMLnCv21fmsv4REBkyG3gzFs5v50LtKKzc6Ch8lFVajgu6o9JF0PD6c0Lg~~&t=qLGVMC130IqtRAjznXvlwQ~~) .

For any questions, please contact the Texas Department of State Health Services hotline as an additional resource about novel coronavirus:

DSHS COVID-19 Call Center: 1-877-570-9779Hours: 7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m., Monday – Friday

Epley Maneuver for Vertigo: Exercises

Your Care Instructions

The Epley Maneuver is a series of movements your doctor may use to treat your vertigo. Here are the steps for the exercises. Your doctor or physical therapist will guide you through the movements.

A single 10- to 15-minute session often is all that’s needed. Crystal debris (canaliths) cause the vertigo.

When your head is moved into different positions, the debris moves freely. This may cause your symptoms to stop.

How to do the exercises

Step 1

1. You will sit on the doctor’s exam table. Your legs will be out in front of you. The doctor or physical therapist will turn your head so that it is halfway between looking straight ahead and looking to the side that causes the worst vertigo.2. Without changing your head position, he or she will guide you back quickly. Your shoulders will be on the table. Your head will hang over the edge of the table. At this point, the side of your head that is causing the worst vertigo will face the floor. You’ll stay in this position for 30 seconds or until your symptoms stop.

Step 2

1. Then, the doctor or physical therapist will turn your head to the other side. You don’t need to lift your head. The other side of your head will face the floor. You will stay in this position for 30 seconds or until your symptoms stop.

Step 3

1. The doctor or physical therapist will help you roll your body in the same direction that your head is facing. You will lie on your side. (For example, if you are looking to your right, you will roll onto your right side.) The side that causes the worst symptoms should be facing up. You’ll stay in this position for another 30 seconds or until your symptoms stop.

Step 4

1. The doctor or physical therapist will then help you to sit back up. Your legs will hang off the table on the same side that you were facing.

Follow-up care is a key part of your treatment and safety. Be sure to make and go to all appointments, and call your doctor if you are having problems. It’s also a good idea to know your test results and keep a list of the medicines you take

If you have any question please call KUDO CARE 972-639-5836 or email us at info@kudocarecenter.com

Blood in the Urine: Care Instructions

Your Care Instructions

Blood in the urine, or hematuria, may make the urine look red, brown, or pink. There may be blood every time you urinate or just from time to time. You cannot always see blood in the urine, but it will show up in a urine test.

Blood in the urine may be serious. It should always be checked by a doctor. Your doctor may recommend more tests, including an X-ray, a CT scan, or a cystoscopy (which lets a doctor look inside the urethra and bladder).

Docotr an dpatient

Blood in the urine can be a sign of another problem. Common causes are bladder infections and kidney stones. An injury to your groin or your genital area can also cause bleeding in the urinary tract. Very hard exercise-such as running a marathon-can cause blood in the urine. Blood in the urine can also be a sign of kidney disease or cancer in the bladder or kidney. Many cases of blood in the urine are caused by a harmless condition that runs in families. This is called benign familial hematuria. It does not need any treatment.

Sometimes your urine may look red or brown even though it does not contain blood. For example, not getting enough fluids (dehydration), taking certain medicines, or having a liver problem can change the color of your urine. Eating foods such as beets, rhubarb, or blackberries or foods with red food coloring can make your urine look red or pink.

Follow-up care is a key part of your treatment and safety. Be sure to make and go to all appointments, and call your doctor if you are having problems. It’s also a good idea to know your test results and keep a list of the medicines you take.

When should you call for help?

Call your doctor now or seek immediate medical care if:

* You have symptoms of a urinary infection. For example:

** You have pus in your urine. ** You have pain in your back just below your rib cage. This is called flank pain. ** You have a fever, chills, or body aches. ** It hurts to urinate. ** You have groin or belly pain.

* You have more blood in your urine.

Watch closely for changes in your health, and be sure to contact your doctor if:

* You have new urination problems. * You do not get better as expected.

If you have any question, please call KUDO CARE at 972-639-5836

Anemia: Care Instructions

Your Care Instructions

Anemia is a low level of red blood cells, which carry oxygen throughout your body. Many things can cause anemia. Lack of iron is one of the most common causes. Your body needs iron to make hemoglobin, a substance in red blood cells that carries oxygen from the lungs to your body’s cells. Without enough iron, the body produces fewer and smaller red blood cells. As a result, your body’s cells do not get enough oxygen, and you feel tired and weak. And you may have trouble concentrating.

arteries

Bleeding is the most common cause of a lack of iron. You may have heavy menstrual bleeding or bleeding caused by conditions such as ulcers, hemorrhoids, or cancer. Regular use of aspirin or other anti-inflammatory medicines (such as ibuprofen) also can cause bleeding in some people. A lack of iron in your diet also can cause anemia, especially at times when the body needs more iron, such as during pregnancy, infancy, and the teen years.

Your doctor may have prescribed iron pills. It may take several months of treatment for your iron levels to return to normal. Your doctor also may suggest that you eat foods that are rich in iron, such as meat and beans.

There are many other causes of anemia. It is not always due to a lack of iron. Finding the specific cause of your anemia will help your doctor find the right treatment for you.

Follow-up care is a key part of your treatment and safety. Be sure to make and go to all appointments, and call your doctor if you are having problems. It’s also a good idea to know your test results and keep a list of the medicines you take.

How can you care for yourself at home?

* Take your medicines exactly as prescribed. Call your doctor if you think you are having a problem with your medicine. * If your doctor recommends iron pills, take them as directed:

** Try to take the pills on an empty stomach about 1 hour before or 2 hours after meals. But you may need to take iron with food to avoid an upset stomach. ** Do not take antacids or drink milk or caffeine drinks (such as coffee, tea, or cola) at the same time or within 2 hours of the time that you take your iron. They can make it hard for your body to absorb the iron. ** Vitamin C (from food or supplements) helps your body absorb iron. Try taking iron pills with a glass of orange juice or some other food that is high in vitamin C, such as citrus fruits. ** Iron pills may cause stomach problems, such as heartburn, nausea, diarrhea, constipation, and cramps. Be sure to drink plenty of fluids, and include fruits, vegetables, and fiber in your diet each day. Iron pills often make your bowel movements dark or green. ** If you forget to take an iron pill, do not take a double dose of iron the next time you take a pill. ** Keep iron pills out of the reach of small children. An overdose of iron can be very dangerous.

* Follow your doctor’s advice about eating iron-rich foods. These include red meat, shellfish, poultry, eggs, beans, raisins, whole-grain bread, and leafy green vegetables. * Steam vegetables to help them keep their iron content.

When should you call for help?

Call 911 anytime you think you may need emergency care. For example, call if:

* You have symptoms of a heart attack. These may include:

** Chest pain or pressure, or a strange feeling in the chest. ** Sweating. ** Shortness of breath. ** Nausea or vomiting. ** Pain, pressure, or a strange feeling in the back, neck, jaw, or upper belly or in one or both shoulders or arms. ** Lightheadedness or sudden weakness. ** A fast or irregular heartbeat.

After you call 911, the operator may tell you to chew 1 adult-strength or 2 to 4 low-dose aspirin. Wait for an ambulance. Do not try to drive yourself. * You passed out (lost consciousness).

Call your doctor now or seek immediate medical care if:

* You have new or increased shortness of breath. * You are dizzy or lightheaded, or you feel like you may faint. * Your fatigue and weakness continue or get worse. * You have any abnormal bleeding, such as:

** Nosebleeds. ** Vaginal bleeding that is different (heavier, more frequent, at a different time of the month) than what you are used to. ** Bloody or black stools, or rectal bleeding. ** Bloody or pink urine.

Watch closely for changes in your health, and be sure to contact your doctor if:

* You do not get better as expected. * If you have any question, please contact us at KUDO CARE 972-639-5836

Learning About Healthy Weight

What is a healthy weight?

A healthy weight is the weight at which you feel good about yourself and have energy for work and play. It’s also one that lowers your risk for health problems.

senior couple

What can you do to stay at a healthy weight?

It can be hard to stay at a healthy weight, especially when fast food, vending-machine snacks, and processed foods are so easy to find. And with your busy lifestyle, activity may be low on your list of things to do. But staying at a healthy weight may be easier than you think.

Here are some dos and don’ts for staying at a healthy weight:

Do eat healthy foods

The kinds of foods you eat have a big impact on both your weight and your health. Reaching and staying at a healthy weight is not about going on a diet. It’s about making healthier food choices every day and changing your diet for good.

Healthy eating means eating a variety of foods so that you get all the nutrients you need. Your body needs protein, carbohydrate, and fats for energy. They keep your heart beating, your brain active, and your muscles working.

On most days, try to eat from each food group. This means eating a variety of:

* Whole grains, such as whole wheat breads and pastas. * Fruits and vegetables. * Dairy products, such as low-fat milk, yogurt, and cheese. * Lean proteins, such as all types of fish, chicken without the skin, and beans.

Don’t have too much or too little of one thing. All foods, if eaten in moderation, can be part of healthy eating. Even sweets can be okay.

If your favorite foods are high in fat, salt, sugar, or calories, limit how often you eat them. Eat smaller servings, or look for healthy substitutes.

Do watch what you eat

Many people eat more than their bodies need. Part of staying at a healthy weight means learning how much food you really need from day to day and not eating more than that. Even with healthy foods, eating too much can make you gain weight.

Having a well-balanced diet means that you eat enough, but not too much, and that your food gives you the nutrients you need to stay healthy. So listen to your body. Eat when you’re hungry. Stop when you feel satisfied.

It’s a good idea to have healthy snacks ready for when you get hungry. Keep healthy snacks with you at work, in your car, and at home. If you have a healthy snack easily available, you’ll be less likely to pick a candy bar or bag of chips from a vending machine instead.

Some healthy snacks you might want to keep on hand are fruit, low-fat yogurt, string cheese, low-fat microwave popcorn, raisins and other dried fruit, nuts, whole wheat crackers, pretzels, carrots, celery sticks, and broccoli.

Do some physical activity

A big part of reaching and staying at a healthy weight is being active.

When you’re active, you burn calories. This makes it easier to reach and stay at a healthy weight. When you’re active on a regular basis, your body burns more calories, even when you’re at rest. Being active helps you lose fat and build lean muscle.

Try to be active for at least 1 hour every day. This may sound like a lot, but it’s okay to be active in smaller blocks of time that add up to 1 hour a day. Any activity that makes your heart beat faster and keeps it there for a while counts. A brisk walk, run, or swim will get your heart beating faster. So will climbing stairs, shooting baskets, or cycling. Even some household chores like vacuuming and mowing the lawn will get your heart rate up.

Pick activities that you enjoy-ones that make your heart beat faster, your muscles stronger, and your muscles and joints more flexible. If you find more than one thing you like doing, do them all. You don’t have to do the same thing every day.

Don’t diet

Diets don’t work.

Diets are temporary. Because you give up so much when you diet, you may be hungry and think about food all the time. And after you stop dieting, you also may overeat to make up for what you missed. Most people who diet end up gaining back the pounds they lost-and more.

Remember that healthy bodies come in lots of shapes and sizes. Everyone can get healthier by eating better and being more active.

If you have any question, please call us at KUDO CARE 972-639-5836

Low Back Pain: Exercises

Your Care Instructions

Here are some examples of typical rehabilitation exercises for your condition. Start each exercise slowly. Ease off the exercise if you start to have pain.

Your doctor or physical therapist will tell you when you can start these exercises and which ones will work best for you.

How to do the exercises

Press-up

1. Lie on your stomach, supporting your body with your forearms. 2. Press your elbows down into the floor to raise your upper back. As you do this, relax your stomach muscles andallow your back to arch without using your back muscles. As your press up, do not let your hips or pelvis come off the floor. 3. Hold for 15 to 30 seconds, then relax. 4. Repeat 2 to 4 times.

Alternate arm and leg (bird dog) exercise

Do this exercise slowly. Try to keep your body straight at all times, and do not let one hip drop lower than the other.

1. Start on the floor, on your hands and knees. 2. Tighten your belly muscles. 3. Raise one leg off the floor, and hold it straight out behind you. Be careful not to let your hip drop down, because that will twist your trunk. 4. Hold for about 6 seconds, then lower your leg and switch to the other leg. 5. Repeat 8 to 12 times on each leg. 6. Over time, work up to holding for 10 to 30 seconds each time. 7. If you feel stable and secure with your leg raised, try raising the opposite arm straight out in front of you at the same time.

Knee-to-chest exercise

1. Lie on your back with your knees bent and your feet flat on the floor. 2. Bring one knee to your chest, keeping the other foot flat on the floor (or keeping the other leg straight, whichever feels better on your lower back). 3. Keep your lower back pressed to the floor. Hold for at least 15 to 30 seconds. 4. Relax, and lower the knee to the starting position. 5. Repeat with the other leg. Repeat 2 to 4 times with each leg. 6. To get more stretch, put your other leg flat on the floor while pulling your knee to your chest.

Curl-ups

curl up

1. Lie on the floor on your back with your knees bent at a 90-degree angle. Your feet should be flat on the floor, about 12 inches from your buttocks. 2. Cross your arms over your chest. If this bothers your neck, try putting your hands behind your neck (not your head), with your elbows spread apart. 3. Slowly tighten your belly muscles and raise your shoulder blades off the floor. 4. Keep your head in line with your body, and do not press your chin to your chest. 5. Hold this position for 1 or 2 seconds, then slowly lower yourself back down to the floor. 6. Repeat 8 to 12 times.

Pelvic tilt exercise

1. Lie on your back with your knees bent. 2. “Brace” your stomach. This means to tighten your muscles by pulling in and imagining your belly button moving toward your spine. You should feel like your back is pressing to the floor and your hips and pelvis are rocking back. 3. Hold for about 6 seconds while you breathe smoothly. 4. Repeat 8 to 12 times.

Heel dig bridging

heel dig bridging

1. Lie on your back with both knees bent and your ankles bent so that only your heels are digging into the floor. Your knees should be bent about 90 degrees. 2. Then push your heels into the floor, squeeze your buttocks, and lift your hips off the floor until your shoulders, hips, and knees are all in a straight line. 3. Hold for about 6 seconds as you continue to breathe normally, and then slowly lower your hips back down to the floor and rest for up to 10 seconds. 4. Do 8 to 12 repetitions.

Hamstring stretch in doorway

1. Lie on your back in a doorway, with one leg through the open door. 2. Slide your leg up the wall to straighten your knee. You should feel a gentle stretch down the back of your leg. 3. Hold the stretch for at least 15 to 30 seconds. Do not arch your back, point your toes, or bend either knee. Keep one heel touching the floor and the other heel touching the wall. 4. Repeat with your other leg. 5. Do 2 to 4 times for each leg.

Hip flexor stretch

1. Kneel on the floor with one knee bent and one leg behind you. Place your forward knee over your foot. Keep your other knee touching the floor. 2. Slowly push your hips forward until you feel a stretch in the upper thigh of your rear leg. 3. Hold the stretch for at least 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat with your other leg. 4. Do 2 to 4 times on each side.

Wall sit

wall sit

1. Stand with your back 10 to 12 inches away from a wall. 2. Lean into the wall until your back is flat against it. 3. Slowly slide down until your knees are slightly bent, pressing your lower back into the wall. 4. Hold for about 6 seconds, then slide back up the wall. 5. Repeat 8 to 12 times.

Follow-up care is a key part of your treatment and safety. Be sure to make and go to all appointments, and call your doctor if you are having problems. It’s also a good idea to know your test results and keep a list of the medicines you take.

Back Stretches: Exercises

Your Care Instructions

Here are some examples of exercises for stretching your back. Start each exercise slowly. Ease off the exercise if you start to have pain.

Your doctor or physical therapist will tell you when you can start these exercises and which ones will work best for you.

How to do the exercises

Overhead stretch

Overstretch

1. Stand comfortably with your feet shoulder-width apart. 2. Looking straight ahead, raise both arms over your head and reach toward the ceiling. Do not allow your head to tilt back. 3. Hold for 15 to 30 seconds, then lower your arms to your sides. 4. Repeat 2 to 4 times.

Side stretch

side stretch

1. Stand comfortably with your feet shoulder-width apart. 2. Raise one arm over your head, and then lean to the other side. 3. Slide your hand down your leg as you let the weight of your arm gently stretch your side muscles. Hold for 15 to 30 seconds. 4. Repeat 2 to 4 times on each side.

Press-up

press up

1. Lie on your stomach, supporting your body with your forearms. 2. Press your elbows down into the floor to raise your upper back. As you do this, relax your stomach muscles and allow your back to arch without using your back muscles. As your press up, do not let your hips or pelvis come off the floor. 3. Hold for 15 to 30 seconds, then relax. 4. Repeat 2 to 4 times.

Relax and rest

relax rest

1. Lie on your back with a rolled towel under your neck and a pillow under your knees. Extend your arms comfortably to your sides. 2. Relax and breathe normally. 3. Remain in this position for about 10 minutes. 4. If you can, do this 2 or 3 times each day.

Follow-up care is a key part of your treatment and safety. Be sure to make and go to all appointments, and call your doctor if you are having problems. It’s also a good idea to know your test results and keep a list of the medicines you take.

Call us at 972-639-5836 or email us at info@kudocarecenter.com if you have any questions

Constipation: Care Instructions

Your Care Instructions

Constipation means that you have a hard time passing stools (bowel movements). People pass stools from 3 times a day to once every 3 days. What is normal for you may be different. Constipation may occur with pain in the rectum and cramping. The pain may get worse when you try to pass stools. Sometimes there are small amounts of bright red blood on toilet paper or the surface of stools. This is because of enlarged veins near the rectum (hemorrhoids). constipation

A few changes in your diet and lifestyle may help you avoid ongoing constipation. Your doctor may also prescribe medicine to help loosen your stool.

Some medicines can cause constipation. These include pain medicines and antidepressants. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take. Your doctor may want to make a medicine change to ease your symptoms.

Follow-up care is a key part of your treatment and safety. Be sure to make and go to all appointments, and call your doctor if you are having problems. It’s also a good idea to know your test results and keep a list of the medicines you take.

How can you care for yourself at home?

* Drink plenty of fluids, enough so that your urine is light yellow or clear like water. If you have kidney, heart, or liver disease and have to limit fluids, talk with your doctor before you increase the amount of fluids you drink. * Include high-fiber foods in your diet each day. These include fruits, vegetables, beans, and whole grains. * Get at least 30 minutes of exercise on most days of the week. Walking is a good choice. You also may want to do other activities, such as running, swimming, cycling, or playing tennis or team sports. * Take a fiber supplement, such as Citrucel or Metamucil, every day. Read and follow all instructions on the label. * Schedule time each day for a bowel movement. A daily routine may help. Take your time having your bowel movement. * Support your feet with a small step stool when you sit on the toilet. This helps flex your hips and places your pelvis in a squatting position. * Your doctor may recommend an over-the-counter laxative to relieve your constipation. Examples are Milk of Magnesia and MiraLax. Read and follow all instructions on the label. Do not use laxatives on a long-term basis.

When should you call for help?

Call your doctor now or seek immediate medical care if:

* You have new or worse belly pain. * You have new or worse nausea or vomiting. * You have blood in your stools.

Watch closely for changes in your health, and be sure to contact your doctor if:

* Your constipation is getting worse. * You do not get better as expected.

Please call 972-639-5836 or email us info@kudocarecenter.com if you have any question

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