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9 Things to Do if You’ve Been Exposed to COVID-19

  1. Stay home. If you’ve been exposed, you should stay in isolation for 14 days. Don’t go to school, work, or public areas. And don’t use public transportation, ride-shares, or taxis unless you have no choice. Leave your home only if you need to get medical care. But call the doctor’s office first so they know you’re coming, and wear a cloth face cover when you go.
  2. Call your doctor. Call your doctor or other health professionals to let them know that you’ve been exposed. They might want you to be tested, or they may have other instructions for you.
  3. If you become sick, wear a face cover when you are around other people. It can help stop the spread of the virus when you cough or sneeze.
  4. Limit contact with people in your home. If possible, stay in a separate bedroom and use a separate bathroom.
  5. Avoid contact with pets and other animals.
  6. Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Then throw it in the trash right away.
  7. Wash your hands often, especially after you cough or sneeze. Use soap and water, and scrub for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water aren’t available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  8. Don’t share personal household items. These include bedding, towels, cups and glasses, and eating utensils.
  9. Clean and disinfect your home every day. Use household cleaners or disinfectant wipes or sprays. Take special care to clean things that you grab with your hands. These include doorknobs, remote controls, phones, and handles on your refrigerator and microwave. And don’t forget countertops, tabletops, bathrooms, and computer keyboards.

IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, PLEASE GIVE US A CALL 972-639-5836 . WE CAN ALSO HELP TEST YOU FOR COVID

10 Things to Do When You Have COVID-19

  1. Stay home. Don’t go to school, work, or public areas. And don’t use public transportation, ride-shares, or taxis unless you have no choice. Leave your home only if you need to get medical care. But call the doctor’s office first so they know you’re coming. And wear a cloth face cover.
  2. Ask before leaving isolation. Talk with your doctor or other health professional about when it will be safe for you to leave isolation.
  3. Wear a cloth face cover when you are around other people. It can help stop the spread of the virus when you cough or sneeze.
  4. Limit contact with people in your home. If possible, stay in a separate bedroom and use a separate bathroom.
  5. Avoid contact with pets and other animals. If possible, have a friend or family member care for them while you’re sick.
  6. Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Then throw the tissue in the trash right away.
  7. Wash your hands often, especially after you cough or sneeze. Use soap and water, and scrub for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water aren’t available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  8. Don’t share personal household items. These include bedding, towels, cups and glasses, and eating utensils.
  9. Clean and disinfect your home every day. Use household cleaners or disinfectant wipes or sprays. Take special care to clean things that you grab with your hands. These include doorknobs, remote controls, phones, and handles on your refrigerator and microwave. And don’t forget countertops, tabletops, bathrooms, and computer keyboards.
  10. Take acetaminophen (Tylenol) to relieve fever and body aches. Read and follow all instructions on the label.

IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, PLEASE CALL US AT 972-639-5836.

Body Mass Index: Care Instructions

Your Care Instructions

Body mass index (BMI) can help you see if your weight is raising your risk for health problems. It uses a formula to compare how much you weigh with how tall you are.

* A BMI lower than 18.5 is considered underweight. * A BMI between 18.5 and 24.9 is considered healthy. * A BMI between 25 and 29.9 is considered overweight. A BMI of 30 or higher is considered obese.

If your BMI is in the normal range, it means that you have a lower risk for weight-related health problems. If your BMI is in the overweight or obese range, you may be at increased risk for weight-related health problems, such as high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, arthritis or joint pain, and diabetes. If your BMI is in the underweight range, you may be at increased risk for health problems such as fatigue, lower protection (immunity) against illness, muscle loss, bone loss, hair loss, and hormone problems.

BMI is just one measure of your risk for weight-related health problems. You may be at higher risk for health problems if you are not active, you eat an unhealthy diet, or you drink too much alcohol or use tobacco products.

Follow-up care is a key part of your treatment and safety. Be sure to make and go to all appointments, and call your doctor if you are having problems. It’s also a good idea to know your test results and keep a list of the medicines you take.

Bodyweight Graph

How can you care for yourself at home?

* Practice healthy eating habits. This includes eating plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein, and low-fat dairy. * If your doctor recommends it, get more exercise. Walking is a good choice. Bit by bit, increase the amount you walk every day. Try for at least 30 minutes on most days of the week. * Do not smoke. Smoking can increase your risk for health problems. If you need help quitting, talk to your doctor about stop-smoking programs and medicines. These can increase your chances of quitting for good. * Limit alcohol to 2 drinks a day for men and 1 drink a day for women. Too much alcohol can cause health problems.

If you have a BMI higher than 25

* Your doctor may do other tests to check your risk for weight-related health problems. This may include measuring the distance around your waist. A waist measurement of more than 40 inches in men or 35 inches in women can increase the risk of weight-related health problems. * Talk with your doctor about steps you can take to stay healthy or improve your health. You may need to make lifestyle changes to lose weight and stay healthy, such as changing your diet and getting regular exercise.

If you have a BMI lower than 18.5

* Your doctor may do other tests to check your risk for health problems. * Talk with your doctor about steps you can take to stay healthy or improve your health. You may need to make lifestyle changes to gain or maintain weight and stay healthy, such as getting more healthy foods in your diet and doing exercises to build muscle.

If you have any question, please call us at KUDO CARE 972-639-5836

Hepatitis A Vaccine for Children: Care Instructions

Your Care Instructions

You can protect your child from hepatitis A with a vaccine. Hepatitis A is a virus that can cause a very serious infection.

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Your child can get this virus in two ways. The first way is eating food contaminated with the virus. The second way is from close contact with someone who has the virus.

This vaccine is recommended for all children at 1 year of age. It’s also recommended for people who are going to travel to countries where hepatitis is common. If your child is older than 1 and has not had this vaccine, talk to your doctor.

The vaccine is given as two shots. The first shot gives your child some protection. But the second one protects your child for at least 20 years. Your child can get the second shot 6 months after the first one.

The shot may cause some pain. It can also make your child fussy or not want to eat. Sometimes children get an upset stomach. But these symptoms aren’t common. If your child has a bad reaction to the first shot, tell your doctor. In this case, it may not be a good idea to get the second shot.

Follow-up care is a key part of your child’s treatment and safety. Be sure to make and go to all appointments, and call your doctor if your child is having problems. It’s also a good idea to know your child’s test results and keep a list of the medicines your child takes.

How can you care for your child at home?

* Give your child acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) for pain. Be safe with medicines. Read and follow all instructions on the label. * Do not give a child two or more pain medicines at the same time unless the doctor told you to. Many pain medicines have acetaminophen, which is Tylenol. Too much acetaminophen (Tylenol) can be harmful. * Do not give aspirin to anyone younger than 20. It has been linked to Reye syndrome, a serious illness. * Put ice or a cold pack on the sore area for 10 to 20 minutes at a time. Put a thin cloth between the ice and your child’s skin.

When should you call for help?

Call 911 anytime you think your child may need emergency care. For example, call if:

* Your child has a seizure. * Your child has symptoms of a severe allergic reaction. These may include:

** Sudden raised, red areas (hives) all over the body. ** Swelling of the throat, mouth, lips, or tongue. ** Trouble breathing. ** Passing out (losing consciousness). Or your child may feel very lightheaded or suddenly feel weak, confused, or restless.

Call your doctor now or seek immediate medical care if:

* Your child has symptoms of an allergic reaction, such as:

** A rash or hives (raised, red areas on the skin). ** Itching. ** Swelling. ** Belly pain, nausea, or vomiting.

* Your child has a high fever. * Your child cries for 3 hours or more within 2 to 3 days after getting the shot.

Watch closely for changes in your child’s health, and be sure to contact your doctor if your child has any problems.

Call us 972-639-5836 for any question you have

Announcing Our New Kudo Care APP

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  • Message Your Providers
  • Remember Your To-Do’s
  • Reach Your Health Goals
  • Test Your Lifestyle
  • Share Data With Your Health Card
  • Works With Your Doctors Systems

Learn More About Our App*

*Available in both the App Store and Google Play

 

ARE E-Cigarettes safe ?

Nicotine is highly addictive. Using e-cigarettes can cause addiction to nicotine.

The adolescent brain is more susceptible to nicotine addiction than fully developed brains of adults.

Nicotine delivered via e-cigarettes is less harmful than smoking tobacco cigarettes. When burned, the tobacco in conventional cigarettes releases thousands of harmful toxins and carcinogens which are the major causes of death and disease from tobacco.

Nicotine alters brain development.6 It can affect cognitive function, memory, and attention when used while the brain is still developing into the mid-20s.

There are no long-term data on the risks of nicotine delivered via e-cigarettes (e.g., heart, lungs, etc).

There are some preliminary data for cardiac effects. One small study in otherwise healthy volunteers (21 to 45 years) showed an association between users of e-cigarettes and a shift in cardiac autonomic balance toward sympathetic predominance and increased oxidative stress. Nicotine is absorbed in e-cigarette users. Approximate saliva concentration of a nicotine metabolite (cotinine):

E-cigarettes (average use 220 puffs/day; variable nicotine content): 353 ng/mL Tobacco cigarettes (26 per day): 340 ng/mL Nicotine patch 21 mg: 165 ng/mL Nicotine nasal spray, 24 doses per day: 150 ng/mL to 200 ng/mL E-cigarettes are a source of secondhand exposure to nicotine and other chemicals. The risks of secondhand vapor are unknown but are expected to be lower than tobacco smoke. Caution is recommended around non-users, youth, pregnant women, people with cardiovascular conditions, etc.

Analysis of common brands of e-cigarettes showed contents included propylene glycol, glycerol, flavoring, diethylene glycol, ethylene glycol, ethanol, formaldehyde, and acrolein. The effect of chronic exposure to these chemicals is not known.

The Canadian Lung Association warns that people who use e-cigarettes are inhaling unknown, unregulated, and potentially harmful substances.

The release of chemicals and contaminants in e-cigarette vapor varies between devices and the way they are used. More chemicals are released (e.g., formaldehyde [a known carcinogen], etc) at higher temperatures.

E-cigarette use has been linked to respiratory symptoms (cough, wheezing, etc).

There is one case report of a previously healthy 18-year-old diagnosed with hypersensitivity pneumonitis after e-cigarette use.

Mental Health Assistance

The staff-assisted depression care support system required for adults is a multi-component system that goes beyond simple feedback of screening results.

In addition to staff support for scheduling follow-up visits and facilitating referrals, other higher-intensity interventions might include elements such as intensive clinician and office support staff training, support staff or specialty mental health provider participation in ongoing depression care, and several follow-up contacts.

Influenza in Pregnant Women

Multiple studies have shown no adverse fetal effects from administration of the inactivated vaccine to the mother during pregnancy.

The AAFP and ACOG both recommend immunization for influenza in pregnant women during influenza season.

Pregnant women should not receive the live attenuated vaccine, however.Breastfeeding women should also be immunized, with either the trivalent inactivated or live attenuated influenza vaccine.

Influenza Vaccines

There is insufficient evidence to support use of the live attenuated influenza vaccine in children under the age of 2.

Children between 6 months and 2 years of age should only receive the trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine.

Children 6 months or older with evidence of, or a history of, reactive airways disease should not receive the live attenuated influenza vaccine.

We have a blood test available for COVID 19

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